Photo credits, clockwise from top: Charles Magnus Bird's Eye View of Alexandria, Library of Congress; Lisa Damico Portraits; Haverford College Quaker and Special Collections.

Photo credits, clockwise from top: Charles Magnus Bird's Eye View of Alexandria, Library of Congress; Lisa Damico Portraits; Haverford College Quaker and Special Collections.

Who hasn't felt stuck in a rut, unsure what to do next in life? I have, and chances are, you have, too.

Now, add to that uncertainty a country in the midst of Civil War and a time when relations between the sexes and races were undergoing radical transformation. Mix in some family drama. Then you will understood what drew me to the story of Julia Wilbur, and why, I think, her story will also absorb you. 

An abolitionist and teacher in Rochester, NY, Julia Wilbur spent most of the war in Union-occupied Alexandria, VA. The only unmarried daughter in a large Quaker family, she almost lived out her days on her family's farm, caring for her father and passing the time until she died.

Then, fate intervened. 

Potomac Books will publish my biography of Julia Wilbur in 2017.

In the meantime, I have posted content about her life and times here, including tidbits that did not make it into the book.

Let me know if you want me to keep you up to date about the book's progress toward publication.